Watercolour paintings of the Wyedean

David Brindley   01531 822213

Brush pencil paper

Creating the Original Watercolours

From fieldwork & photography to composition & colour

 

 

Although a photo is an artform in its own right I use photography

as a useful resource, helping to gather a wealth of

reference material for future projects. Always travelling with a camera can pay dividends as favourite locations are visited,

new places discovered, each one  inspiring new compositions.  

IMG_9856 May Hill crop
IMG_8318 crop

PHOTOGRAPHY

pencil sketch Tintern
wash sketch Tintern

 

 

"Take one piece of paper and,

metaphorically, punch a hole in it"

That, in essence, is what the artist is

doing when composing a landscape painting.

 

What looks pleasing on the eye is an important aspect in a composition, inviting the viewer to be drawn in. The composition, the artist's style

and the significance of the location combine to create interest in each landscape painting.    

THE ART OF COMPOSITION

 

 

Every painting begins with the daunting prospect of staring at a blank piece of paper.

With courage the salient features are

sketched out as a simple pencil outline!

GETTING STARTED

biscuit

 

 

Sky and background blocks of colour are laid using broad brushstrokes to indicate the structure and key areas of the

painting. Most of these early colour washes will be eventually hidden as

more detail is added.

BROAD WASHES

Detail Tintern

 

 

The detail is now introduced, working from light to dark and interpreting the architectural and landscape textures with colour and tonal contrast.

WORKING TOWARDS THE FINISHED WATERCOLOUR

I have found over the years that you should never under-estimate just how much a McVities chocolate biscuit can help an artist!

Tintern Abbey - detail